Reel

Coming soon.






Press:


"'Henry IV, Part 1' was especially enhanced by the electric turns of Brandon Carter as Hal and KP Powell as the prince’s soldier-rival, Hotspur, who exists on a kind of testosterone overload...the actors clashed with a dazzling athleticism, as well as a perceptive command of the emotions churning within each of them." - Peter Marks: The Washington Post
"Mardonius (KP Powell), a soldier and truth-teller whose relationship with Arbaces is founded on the risks he takes in battle, and thus can take with Arbaces.  It is Mardonius who challenges Arbaces’ most grandiose posturings, and who can accordingly drive the King to a moral conclusion. Powell gets Mardonius’ nobility, but more importantly, his shrewdness; you can see, by the way Powell moves his head and eyes, how Mardonius is calculating his room to maneuver. And, at the crucial moment, when Arbaces asks Mardonius to intercede (and not in a nice way) with his sister, you can see Powell’s Mardonius give up his calculations, and just say no."
-Tim Treanor: DC Theatre Scene

"KP Powell as Captain Mardonius...serves as commentator/narrator in his plain-honest dialogues and asides. He reacts to the increasing craziness around the court with composed incredulity, at one point even pulling a leather bag of popcorn out of his vest to munch on as he watches the proceedings. In the climactic scene, Mardonius doesn’t have many lines, but Powell in the back corner says so much more with his reactionary expressions than anything Beaumont and Fletcher could put in his mouth."
-Eric Minton: Shakespeareances
"...the villa’s owner Anthony Wilding (KP Powell) add(s) more charm and romance to the mix to make 'Enchanted April' totally enchanting."-Judy Harrison: Bangor Daily News

"The night's most chilling moment comes when KP Powell, the (excellent) black actor playing Jefferson, takes it upon himself to strike the slavery clause from the Declaration." - Josh Garstka: Talkin' Broadway
"KP Powell is marvelous as Thomas Jefferson. His powerful tenor voice soars in “But, Mr. Adams” and “The Egg.” His argument scene with...Adams is dynamic" -
Tony Annicone: Theater Mirror
"Slender only speaks three lines in this scene...The gag has never made sense to me on the page and has never worked on a stage--until now...Powell scores the scene's exit laugh." - Eric Minton: Shakespeareances
"KP Powell in the role of devilish painter Clarke offers up big laughs from his preposterous murder formulas to his sidesplitting use of protective glasses."- CM Gorey: C-ville Weekly
"Atticus has been assigned an unwinnable case - that of Tom Robinson (a heartbreakingly fine [KP] Powell)" -Andrea Braun: The Vital Voice